Strong and secure: A strategy for Australia’s national security

  • Published: 23 January 2013
  • Filed: 30 January 2013
  • 3 responses
Soldiers of the 16th Aviation Brigade (Photo: Australian Army)

Soldiers of the 16th Aviation Brigade (Photo: Australian Army)

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard launched the country’s first National Security Strategy on 23 January 2013.

Strong and secure: A strategy for Australia’s national security marks a new national security era in which the dramatic shift of economic and strategic weight to Asia dominates Australia’s national security outlook over this decade.

The strategy describes the eight pillars of the government’s approach to national security:

  • Countering terrorism, espionage and foreign interference.
  • Deterring and defeating attacks on Australia and Australia’s interests.
  • Preserving our border integrity.
  • Preventing, detecting and disrupting serious and organised crime.
  • Promoting a secure international environment conducive to advancing Australia’s interests.
  • Strengthening the resilience of Australia’s people, assets, infrastructure and institutions.
  • The Australia-United States alliance.
  • Understanding and being influential in the world, particularly the Asia-Pacific.

It also outlines three priorities for the next five years, to achieve their
vision for national security:

  • Enhanced engagement in support of regional security and prosperity in the Asian Century.
  • Integrated cyber policy and operations to enhance the defence of our digital networks.
  • Effective partnerships to achieve innovative and efficient national security outcomes.

Source: Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Australian Government (Australia)

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  • Joel Vargas

    They have a great program going. The Australian Federal Police has been very proactive adopting new techniques to policing. They are also very willing to learn from others unlike the UK and the US, where they they they know everything.

    Last year, Contingent Security Services, Ltd. began to work and developed a nationwide informal intelligence program for all 11 airports. The heads of intelligence and transnational crime all reached out to our company each one of them seeking assistance to address different issues, one which was the Mexican Drug Cartels. The other are classified.

    Knowing Australia and having strong and familiar ties with Commissioner Tony Negus, I can say that they are heading in the right direction.

    Joel Vargas, Assistant Director
    InterPortPolice

    • http://www.chrisabbott.info/ Chris Abbott

      Thanks Joel. I agree, the AFP do seem willing to learn from others – something that is both refreshing and worth other forces replicating.

    • http://www.chrisabbott.info/ Chris Abbott

      Thanks Joel. I agree, the AFP do seem willing to learn from others – something that is both refreshing and worth other forces replicating.

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